Friday, November 24, 2017

Week in Seven Words #372

dust
Cleaning out shelves, coming across movies I used to like and books I've forgotten about.

eluding
Chasing an almost-chocolate flavor in a supposedly healthier variant of ice cream.

murine
The dog looks mouse-like with her new haircut, especially when she wiggles between our feet in search of crumbs.

propped
The woman sitting next to me is pregnant and uses her belly as a shelf for the book so we can both read from it.

shape
In the dark, it's the neon shorts, t-shirts, and crop tops that are the most visible parts of the joggers, who advance in a 3x3 squad. They look like a collection of colorful squares and rectangles that rise and fall piston-like against a gray screen.

unconvincing
He sings about "sticking it to the man" (or something to that effect), and it sounds tired and lame. The sentiments of rebellion have been commercialized.

viridian
By the streetlights, the trees have an icy green-blue tint, as if they've been flavored with mint.

3 comments:

Brian Joseph said...

Unconvincing and commercialized rebellion seems to be all too common these days. I suppose that has happened to many movements throughout history.

Revisiting older things that I have lost interest in is a disorientating experience for me.

Roderick Robinson said...

I will show you terror in a handful of dust, says Thomas Stearns, once one of your citizens, until we grabbed him and sort of canonised him. I suppose we could see this as strong advocacy for regular use of the vacuum cleaner.

I'm intrigued by "used to like" since it seems to imply "no longer like". If so, that gap deserves exploration. What happens in between? Does sophistication grow over time? Or does, as the saying goes, familiarity breed contempt? I'm astonished to discover that that scrap of wisdom dates back to Chaucer (14th century), even more astonished that it is the punchline to a fable, The Fox And The Lion, by Mr Aesop who has even more impressive dates (620 - 564 BC). Couldn't resist that parenthesis, proof that we once counted time backwards.

But since Mr Aesop had to be translated the actual date is no doubt otherwise and I would be better employed de-dusting the carpet.

HKatz said...

@ Brian - disorienting and sometimes surprising (though sometimes it also makes me feel nostalgic

@ Roderick - that's a great question: what happens in between.