Friday, July 22, 2016

Week in Seven Words #298

convulsed
A piece of driftwood rocks in the middle of the bay, when a sea gull launches off of it.

enigmatic
The warped stone sculpture could be many things. I see it as a woman wearing a cowl.

nosh
He returns to the table with beer, pretzels, and hummus.

sheathe
Pettiness encased in righteous sentiment.

splashiness
One man has shimmering birds on his shirt. Another wears a sunset on his shorts. A woman puts on a swim dress in pastel American flag colors. Underneath it, her bathing suit is a riot of neon green and orange, colors straight out of the opening credits to a Nickelodeon show.

terms
She's stuck on an algebra problem. "We're going to help you," they tell her. They look over her shoulder. "Why don't you just take out the variables?" "I can't do that," she says. They shake their heads. "You're making things too complicated. Just remove the variables, and you're good." She tries to explain the problem to them, but they cut her off. "Why are you being so difficult?" they say. "We want to help you."

tissue
Some of his tattoos seem to spring from his muscles like strips of animated film. His other tattoos are more static and turn his chest and back into a billboard ad.

4 comments:

Brian Joseph said...

The word 'nosh", while not new seems to be gaining popularity over the last few years. I have used it outside the Tri - State area and people have looked at me with bewilderment. Thus I think that it may be popular regionally.

HKatz said...

I'm not sure about its Internet use, but offline I usually only hear it in connection to foods associated with Jews or New Yorkers.

Yvonne@fiction-books said...

Hi Hila,

I like the word 'splashiness', so much better than the 'showy' word I would have used. Clashing up colours and patterns seems to be the 'in' thing to do right now, although it's not for me. I still prefer my dark colours and black.

Nosh is a typically British word I would say. It is widely used all over the country and has been for many years, and it is a word that just about everyone recognises. Although personally, 'snacking' is a much nicer description I think.

Great personal descriptions as ever :)

Yvonne

HKatz said...

Thanks, Yvonne.

"Nosh is a typically British word I would say. It is widely used all over the country and has been for many years, and it is a word that just about everyone recognizes."

That's so interesting - I'd never thought of 'nosh' used by British speakers.